Pulled by…….wait, WHAT??

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I was so excited to have found all of these images.  This collection spans quite a bit of time, but the photos are all uniquely interesting. My favorite would have to be the lion pulling the children in the cart, that is awesome!  It is really neat to see the ingenuity of some people in the past.  I could not imagine being in or using a cart being pulled by some of these animals. I did of course, for reference, include a human pulled rickshaw 🙂 What is your favorite?  Please let me know and rate the article at the bottom!

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Circus is coming to town…..

Sanger's Circus Late 19th Century

Sanger’s Circus Late 19th Century

We all know the names of The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus.  They have been one of the biggest Circus troupes of all time.  They truly have an amazing history, particularly if you have a chance to read it in detail. From Wikipedia:

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus is an American circus company billed as The Greatest Show on Earth. The company was started in 1919 when the circus created by James Anthony Bailey and P. T. Barnum was merged with the Ringling Brothers Circus. The Ringling brothers purchased the Barnum & Bailey Circus in 1907, but ran the circuses separately until they were finally merged in 1919.”

There were many circus acts before them, some quite spectacular in their own rights.  I have put together a collection of phots I have pulled from various sources. I hope you will enjoy!

As a side note, what circus is complete without freaks, I included some of them here.   It was hard for me to include these because of the obvious exploitation of these people.  On the other hand, their notoriety brought them a type of respect and fellowship which otherwise would they would not have had.

I included a lot of photos in this post, please enjoy each of them and let me know your favorites!

Walt Disney Circus

Walt Disney Circus

The Escalante Circus - founded 1909

The Escalante Circus – founded 1909

Society Circus Horses. It was made between 1910 and 1917

Society Circus Horses. It was made between 1910 and 1917

1894 St. Petersburg Russia

1894 St. Petersburg Russia

a one-of-a-kind photograph of Jack Barrett with Barnum Circus

a one-of-a-kind photograph of Jack Barrett with Barnum Circus

Henry Bros. Wagon early 1900's

Henry Bros. Wagon early 1900’s

Circus in Salem 1898

Circus in Salem 1898

Clowns and Horse. It was made between 1915 and 1917

Clowns and Horse. It was made between 1915 and 1917

Clowns On a Horse. It was taken between 1915 and 1917

Clowns On a Horse. It was taken between 1915 and 1917

exhibit

Gainesville TX Circus 1923

Gainesville TX Circus 1923

Ruth Davis, the penguin girl had seal limbs a disease called phocomelia. It is what gave her the penguin appearance.

Ruth Davis, the penguin girl had seal limbs a disease called phocomelia. It is what gave her the penguin appearance.

Prince Randian He was known as the living torso, human caterpillar, pillow man, and the human cigar. He was born in 1871 and died in December 1934.

Prince Randian He was known as the living torso, human caterpillar, pillow man, and the human cigar. He was born in 1871 and died in December 1934.

Mademoiselle Gabrielle was born in Switzerland in 1884. She was a perfect lady until you got to her torso, and then she just ended

Mademoiselle Gabrielle was born in Switzerland in 1884. She was a perfect lady until you got to her torso, and then she just ended

Born as Simon Metz was born in the Bronx in 1901. He was born with microlephaly a disorder that gave him a small brain and the IQ of a 3yr He was beloved to all and died in 1971

Born as Simon Metz was born in the Bronx in 1901. He was born with microlephaly a disorder that gave him a small brain and the IQ of a 3yr He was beloved to all and died in 1971

Prince Randian and the Half Man

Prince Randian and the Half Man

Prince Randian was actually a pretty interesting man!  He was married and had five children, his amazing story can be found in more detail here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Randian

 

 

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Americans II

Bears Belly, an Arikara indian man in a Half-length Portrait. It was taken in 1908

Bears Belly, an Arikara indian man in a Half-length Portrait. It was taken in 1908

I have said it before, but I am newly amazed every time I view these 100+ year old photographs.  These were taken exclusively by Edward Curtis in the very early 1900’s.  American Indians should simply be called Americans, they were here first and it was their land before it was ours.   I post these as a tribute to a beautiful people!  Be sure to let me know your favorite photo and feel free to comment 🙂

Zuni Medicine Man, Grinding Medicine. It was created in 1903

Zuni Medicine Man, Grinding Medicine. It was created in 1903

Zuni Brave. It was made in 1903

Zuni Brave. It was made in 1903

Zuni Bead Worker Drilling Holes. It was created in 1903

Zuni Bead Worker Drilling Holes. It was created in 1903

White Shield, an Indian Chief. It was made in 1908

White Shield, an Indian Chief. It was made in 1908

Swallow Bird, a handsome Crow Indian in Montana. It was taken in 1908

Swallow Bird, a handsome Crow Indian in Montana. It was taken in 1908

Navaho Chief. It was made in 1904

Navaho Chief. It was made in 1904

Nova, a Walapai Man. It was taken in 1906

Nova, a Walapai Man. It was taken in 1906

Pimas Indian School Girl. It was created in 1907

Pimas Indian School Girl. It was created in 1907

Raven Blanket. It was made in 1910

Raven Blanket. It was made in 1910

Slow Bull Praying to the Great Spirit. It was created in 1907

Slow Bull Praying to the Great Spirit. It was created in 1907

Mizheh Babe, and Indian Mother. It was made in 1906

Mizheh Babe, and Indian Mother. It was made in 1906

Maricopa Water Girl. It was made in 1907

Maricopa Water Girl. It was made in 1907

Maricopa Water Girl. It was made in 1906

Maricopa Water Girl. It was made in 1906

Maricopa Indian Child. It was taken in 1907

Maricopa Indian Child. It was taken in 1907

Klamath Indian Head-dress. It was created in 1923

Klamath Indian Head-dress. It was created in 1923

Apache Papoose. It was made in 1903

Apache Papoose. It was made in 1903

Bears Belly, an Arikara indian man in a Half-length Portrait. It was taken in 1908

Bears Belly, an Arikara indian man in a Half-length Portrait. It was taken in 1908

Crow Warriors On Horseback. It was taken in 1908

Crow Warriors On Horseback. It was taken in 1908

Honovi-Walpi, a Hopi Snake Priest, with Totkya. It was made in 1910

Honovi-Walpi, a Hopi Snake Priest, with Totkya. It was made in 1910

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Comanche, Only US Army Survivor From Little Big Horn Battle

You are looking at an artistic picture of "Comanche," the only survivor of the Custer Massacre, 1876. History of the horse and regimental orders of the 7th Cavalry as to the care of "Comanche" as long as he shall live. It was created in 1887

You are looking at an artistic picture of “Comanche,” the only survivor of the Custer Massacre, 1876. History of the horse and regimental orders of the 7th Cavalry as to the care of “Comanche” as long as he shall live. It was created in 1887

COMANCHE

American Icon

It is the afternoon of 27 June 1876, on the Little Bighorn River  in southeastern Montana.  Members of the besieged group of soldiers from the  Reno Hill entrenchment sadly explore the scene of “sickening, ghastly horror” on Custer Hill.  They now know the answer to the question that so many had repeatedly asked two days before…”Where’s Custer?”

As they walked among the bloating, decaying bodies of their fallen comrades, all was still.  As the cavalrymen bowed their heads in silent prayer before beginning the odious task of burying the dead, the silence was abruptly broken by the faint whinny of a horse.  As the men looked up and searched the broken terrain with weary, tearful eyes, down by the river a horse was struggling to get to its feet.    Several of the men recognized the horse because of its peculiar buckskin-like color.  It was Comanche, the favorite mount of Capt. Myles Keogh, who had

Myles Keogh

Myles Keogh (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

valiantly rallied the men of “I” Company right up to the end, when they were overwhelmed by the charge of warriors under Crazy Horse and Gall.  The horse was on its haunches, seemingly too weak to move any further.  He had apparently sustained at least seven wounds, and his coat was matted with dried blood and soil.  CPT Nowlan ordered the men to get water for the horse from the river.  Several other troopers coaxed the horse onto its feet and led it away.  The farrier field dressed the wounds.  Comanche marched with the command to the junction of the Little Bighorn and Bighorn Rivers, and was loaded aboard the steamer “Far West” with the battle casualties, heading home to Fort Lincoln.  Comanche never again was to charge to the sound of the bugle. For the next 15 years he served as the spirit of the Seventh Cavalry supporting them throughout the remainder of the Indian Wars.  Symbolically, he died in 1891, soon after The Wounded Knee Conflict, established to be the end of major hostilities between the Native Americans and the military.  TAPS, for an old soldier who served his country  well, in so many ways.

A fully recovered Comanche at Fort Lincoln after the Battle

Comanche is now remembered as the only surviving member of LTC George A. Custer‘s immediate command at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

He has always been a symbol of the role of the U.S. Cavalry in the taming of the great plains during the era of  western expansion. When he died in 1891 his remains were preserved for eternity. Comanche now resides in the Dyche Natural History Museum on the campus of the University of Kansas at Lawrence. He resides in a specially designed humidity-controlled glass enclosure. 

Comanche joined the 7th Cavalry on April 3, 1868. He had been captured somewhere on the southern plains and brought, along with other horses, to a remount station in St. Louis, Missouri.  There, he was purchased by the Army for the existing rate of $90.  Comanche had his initial breaking-in at the remount station and then was shipped with a group of other horses to Fort Leavenworth. There, Comanche had his introduction to the 7th Cavalry when he was chosen to be among the 41 horses that LT Tom Custer (brother of the General) selected to be loaded on a train bound for Ellis Station, where the 7th was encamped. He arrived at the encampment on May 19, 1868, a little over one month after joining the army.  It was here that Comanche caught the eye of Capt Keogh, who was looking for a replacement for a horse that had been shot from under him in a skirmish with Indians.  After eyeing the new “recruits” for several minutes, something must have made Comanche stand out as having the potential to be a good cavalry mount.  Surely officers had first choice in selecting a horse for their use, and Keogh quickly ordered Comanche to be his mount.  Keogh may have purchased Comanche from the army. Be that as it may, they were inseparable until that fateful day in June, 1876.

Photograph taken in 1879 during U.S. Army re-b...

Photograph taken in 1879 during U.S. Army re-burial visit to the Custer battlefield. The expedition was led by Captain George K. Sanderson, seen here in the foreground looking at the recently erected monument to Myles Keogh and the fallen members of Company I, 7th US Cavalry. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There is some controversy as to how Comanche got his name. The most widely accepted story is that on September 13, 1868 Capt Keogh was involved in a skirmish with a band of Comanche Indians. During the fight the horse was wounded by an arrow in the right hind quarter. The arrow was later removed, and the wound healed. After the battle, a trooper who witnessed the incident claimed that when the arrow struck, the horse “yelled just like a Comanche” If this were true, then Comanche would have been in Keogh’s possession for over four months without having been assigned a name.  This seems to be an unlikely scenario, as just with a newborn infant, a name or method of identifying the child is quickly established.  Another story might explain the naming delay.  So it goes, Keogh was on a scouting mission near Fort Larned, Kansas.  During a skirmish with the Comanches, Keogh’s horse was killed.  Supposedly his Lt. dismounted one of the enlisted men and turned the mount over to Keogh, who kept the horse from that point on. The horse was then named Comanche, and became Keogh’s favorite mount from that point on. It is stated that at that time, with the exception of the officers’ horses, it was not customary to give names to cavalry horses.
What did Comanche look like? As one inspects the old photos of Comanche, he appears to be dark in color, typical of the bay mounts used by the cavalry.  This aberration of his true color, variously described as “claybank,” “light bay” or  “buckskin dun” is probably a function of the level of sophistication of frontier photography. On July 25, 1887, 2LT James D. Thomas, Acting Adjutant of 7th Cavalry at Ft. Meade, Dakota Territory, certified a description of Comanche prior to transferring his care to CPT Henry J. Nowlan, 7th Cavalry:Name: Comanche
Age: 6 years(25 years at time of transfer)
Height: 15 hands
Weight: 925 pounds
Color: Buckskin
Condition: Unserviceable
Date of Purchase: April 3, 1868
By Whom: (left blank)
Cost: $90.00
Purchased: St. Louis, Missouri
Remarks: excused from all duties per G.O. No. 7 April 10, 1878. Ridden by CPT Keogh in Battle of Little Bighorn River, M.T. June 25, 1876
Comanche and Keogh served with “I” Company and Keogh for the remainder of his active career. However, due to deployments of “I” Company away from the main regiment and leaves of absence taken by Keogh, Comanche missed the major battles engaged in by the unit. At the time of the summer, 1867 campaign that included the Kidder Massacre, Keogh was commanding officer at Fort Wallace. During the Washita campaign, Keogh was on GEN Sully’s staff, assigned to Fort Harker. At the time of the 1873 Yellowstone Expedition, Keogh was serving on detached duty with the International Boundary Commission at Fort Totten, Minnesota, near Canada. Keogh was on leave, visiting his home land, and therefore was not a part of the 1874 Black Hills expedition. The latter proved to be more of a pleasure trip, since no significant engagement with Indians was made.
It took almost a year for Comanche to recover from his wounds. His care was always under the watchful eye of Gustave Korn, the farrier, assigned to him by CPT Nowlan. Comanche quickly became the mascot of the 7th at Ft. Lincoln, and legend has it that the daughter of the commander (COL Sturgis), convinced CPT Nowlan to let her ride Comanche about the post. Then one day the daughter of another officer requested and was granted permission to ride Comanche, and when Sturgis’s daughter became aware of this she became so enraged that her special status had been breached that she caused a lot of trouble around the Sturgis household. This, more than anything else probably led to COL Sturgis issuing G.O.[General Orders] No. 7. In part, this stated that “…a special and comfortable stall is fitted up for him, and he will not be ridden by any person whatsoever under any circumstances, nor will he be put to any kind of work.” Comanche could be used in parades, draped in mourning and led by a mounted trooper of Troop I.
Comanche at Fort Riley, Kansas

Comanche at Fort Riley, Kansas

From that point on, Comanche led a free and peaceful life. he was allowed the freedom of the Post, the only living thing that wandered at will over the parade grounds at the fort without a reprimand from a commanding officer.  When the bugle sounded “formation,” Comanche would trot out to his place in front of the line of Troop I. He would be given sugar cubes on demand at the door of the officers’ quarters and then saunter on down to the enlisted men’s canteen where a specially placed bucket of beer awaited him.  Gustave Korn and Comanche became inseparable.  Comanche would follow Korn everywhere. When the unit returned to Ft. Riley, Kansas, it is stated that Korn was visiting a lady friend in the nearby town of Junction City.  When Korn did not return to the base to feed and groom Comanche for the evening, that the horse looked all over the base for Korn, finally going directly to the house of the girlfriend to escort Korn back to the Post. When Korn was killed at Wounded Knee in 1890, Comanche’s health began to slowly deteriorate. He died on November 7, 1891.

Comanche preserved forever at the University of Kansas

The officers and men of the 7th Cavalry were heartbroken. One of them suggested that Comanche be preserved forever by being mounted and kept with the unit.  A famous professor at the University of Kansas Museum of Natural History was summoned to the Fort. He agreed to preserve Comanche for $400 and the right to display the horse at the upcoming Exposition in Chicago in 1893. Later, when for reasons still not clear, the bill was not paid and Dyche agreed to keep Comanche in lieu of payment. Comanche still stands there today for all to see – the “sole survivor of Custer’s command at the Little Bighorn.

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On a wagon west. 1884

On a wagon west. 1884

Cannot imagine what this would have been like!