Old India

I love scouring the web for old photos.  I found some real treasures when I stumbled across these old photos from India!  Please let me know which are your favorites and if you would like to see more of them, there are a bunch more waiting to be posted 🙂

 

All photos are from and used with permission of: http://www.oldindianphotos.in/

Women Grinding Paint - Calcutta c1845

Women Grinding Paint – Calcutta c1845

Three Hindu Ladies - c1880's

Three Hindu Ladies – c1880’s

The-Maharaja-of-Mysore-Krishnaraja-Wadiyar-IV---2nd-February-1895

The-Maharaja-of-Mysore-Krishnaraja-Wadiyar-IV—2nd-February-1895

The Birdseller, Albumen Print - 19th Century

The Birdseller, Albumen Print – 19th Century

Street and Lower Bazaar at Simla 1890's

Street and Lower Bazaar at Simla 1890’s

SINHALESE DEVIL DANCERS - Ceylon (Sri Lanka) c1890's

SINHALESE DEVIL DANCERS – Ceylon (Sri Lanka) c1890’s

Jain Temples in Palitana, Gujarat - c1880's

Jain Temples in Palitana, Gujarat – c1880’s

Maha Lawka Maya Zain Pagoda (Kuthodaw Pagoda) - Mandalay, Burma (Myanmar) c1880's

Maha Lawka Maya Zain Pagoda (Kuthodaw Pagoda) – Mandalay, Burma (Myanmar) c1880’s

Maharao Shri Khengarji III of Cutch - c1900

Maharao Shri Khengarji III of Cutch – c1900

Portrait-of-Two-Women-by-Raja-Deen-Dayal-and-Sons---Date-Unknown

Portrait-of-Two-Women-by-Raja-Deen-Dayal-and-Sons—Date-Unknown

Sein Kyaw, Burmese Dancing Girl - Burma c1900's

Sein Kyaw, Burmese Dancing Girl – Burma c1900’s

Group Photograph of House Servants - Late 19th Century

Group Photograph of House Servants – Late 19th Century

Group of men and Children at a village Near Keylong, Lahaul and Spiti District, Himachal Pradesh - c1903

Group of men and Children at a village Near Keylong, Lahaul and Spiti District, Himachal Pradesh – c1903

Gateway of the Tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah - Agra, c1860's

Gateway of the Tomb of I’timād-ud-Daulah – Agra, c1860’s

Double Bullock Carts - Ceylon (Sri Lanka) c1890's

Double Bullock Carts – Ceylon (Sri Lanka) c1890’s

Camel with Attendant - Jaipur, Rajasthan, c1900's

Camel with Attendant – Jaipur, Rajasthan, c1900’s

Children in North Bihar, India - May 1951

Children in North Bihar, India – May 1951

A Reclining Woman Wearing Jewellery, with a Hookah on the Left - Lucknow 1872

A Reclining Woman Wearing Jewellery, with a Hookah on the Left – Lucknow 1872

109 year old Apatani woman of slave class with nose plugs, Subansiri Frontier District, India, ca. 1954

109 year old Apatani woman of slave class with nose plugs, Subansiri Frontier District, India, ca. 1954

A Reclining Woman Wearing Jewellery, with a Hookah on the Left - Lucknow 1872

A Reclining Woman Wearing Jewellery, with a Hookah on the Left – Lucknow 1872

Aghoree,-Hindoo-Mendicant---Benares-(Varanasi)-c1860's

Aghoree,-Hindoo-Mendicant—Benares-(Varanasi)-c1860’s

Andaman Tribals Fishing - Circa 1870

Andaman Tribals Fishing – Circa 1870

 

THE Vest…..

Soviet steel breastplate SN-42. Armor = 2mm. Weight = 3.5 kg

Soviet steel breastplate SN-42. Armor = 2mm. Weight = 3.5 kg

I ran across an old picture of bulletproof vest testing.  The guy in the vest is either really brave or…….well kind of insane in my opinion.  This spurred me on to take a look at the history of the projectile proof vest which naturally led to the history of fire arms.  I had absolutely no Idea that explosive projectiles have been around for more than a thousand years.  I have included some wiki below:

Early Modern era

In 1538, Francesco Maria della Rovere commissioned Filippo Negroli to create a bulletproof vest. In 1561, Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor is recorded as testing his armor against gun-fire. Similarly, in 1590 Sir Henry Lee expected his Greenwich armor to be “pistol proof”. Its actual effectiveness was controversial at the time.[2] The etymology of “bullet” and the adjective form of “proof” in the late 16th century would suggest that the term “bulletproof” originated shortly thereafter.

During the English Civil War Oliver Cromwell‘s Ironside cavalry were equipped with Capeline helmets and musket-proof cuirasses which consisted of two layers of armor plate (in later studies involving X-ray a third layer was discovered which was placed in between the outer and inner layer). The outer layer was designed to absorb the bullet’s energy and the thicker inner layer stopped further penetration. The armor would be left badly dented but still serviceable.[3] One of the first recorded descriptions of soft armor use was found in medieval Japan, with the armor having been manufactured from silk.[4]

Polish inventor Jan Szczepanik. On the photo - the first (and success) test of the invention (1901) done by Mr. Borzykowski

Polish inventor Jan Szczepanik. On the photo – the first (and success) test of the invention (1901) done by Mr. Borzykowski

Industrial era

One of the first commercially sold bulletproof armour was produced by a tailor in Dublin, Ireland in the 1840s. The Cork Examiner reported on his line of business in December 1847:[5]

The daily melancholy announcements of assassination that are now disgracing the country, and the murderers permitted to walk quietly away and defy the law, have induced me to get constructed a garment, shot and ball proof, so that every man can be protected, and enabled to return the fire of the assassin, and thus soon put a stop to the cowardly conduct which has deprived society of so many excellent and valuable lives, spreading terror and desolation through the country. I hope in a few days to have a specimen garment on view at my warerooms.

Another soft ballistic vest, Myeonje baegab, was invented in Joseon, Korea in the 1860s shortly after the French campaign against Korea. Heungseon Daewongun ordered development of bullet-proof armor because of increasing threats from Western armies. Kim Gi-Doo and Gang Yoon found that cotton could protect against bullets if 10 layers of cotton fabric were used. The vests were used in battle during the United States expedition to Korea, when the US Navy attacked Ganghwa Island in 1871. The US Navy captured one of the vests and took it to the US, where it was stored at the Smithsonian Museum until 2007. The vest has since been sent back to Korea and is currently on display to the public.[citation needed]

Testing of new bulletproof vests, 1923

Testing of new bulletproof vests, 1923

Simple ballistic armor was sometimes constructed by criminals. During the 1880s, a gang of Australian bushrangers led by Ned Kelly made basic armour from plough blades. By this time the Victorian Government had a reward for the capture of a member of the Kelly Gang at £8,000 (equivalent to $2 million Australian dollars in 2005). One of the stated aims of Kelly was the establishment of a Republic in North East Victoria. Each of the four Kelly gang members had fought a siege at a hotel clad in suits of armour made from the mouldboards of ploughs. The maker’s stamp (Lennon Number 2 Type) was found inside several of the plates. The men used the armour to cover their torsos, upper arms, and upper legs, and was worn with a helmet.

The suits were roughly made on a creek bed using a makeshift forge and a stringy-bark log as a muffled anvil. They had a mass of around 44 kg (96 lb), making the wearer a spectacular sight yet proved too unwieldy during a police raid at Glenrowan. Their armour deflected many hits with none penetrating, but eventually was of no use as the suits lacked protection for the legs and hands.

Ned Kelly armour, located at the State Library of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia,

Ned Kelly armour, located at the State Library of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia,

World War I german Infantrie Panzer, 1918

World War I german Infantrie Panzer, 1918

In 1881, Tombstone physician George E. Goodfellow noticed that a Faro dealer Luke Short who was shot was saved by his silk handkerchief in his breast pocket that prevented the bullet from penetrating.[6][7] In 1887, he wrote an article titled Impenetrability of Silk to Bullets[8] for the Southern California Practitioner documenting the first known instance of bulletproof fabric. He experimented with[9] silk vests resembling medieval gambesons, which used 18 to 30 layers of silk fabric to protect the wearers from penetration.

Fr. Kazimierz Żegleń used Goodfellow’s findings to develop a bulletproof vest made of silk fabric at the end of the 19th century, which could stop the relatively slow rounds from black powder handguns. The vests cost $800 USD each in 1914, a small fortune at the time the modern day equivalent of $18,710 USD. On 28 June 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir to the throne of Austria-Hungary, was wearing a silk bulletproof vest when he was attacked by a gun-wielding assassin. He was shot in the neck and the vest did not protect him.

Two American GIs wearing M1951 bullet-proof vests on Triangle Hill

Two American GIs wearing M1951 bullet-proof vests on Triangle Hill

Marines with Security Company, Combat Logistics Battalion 4, Combat Logistics Regiment 3, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, adjust Lance Cpl. Andrew Best’s Modular Tactical Vest

Marines with Security Company, Combat Logistics Battalion 4, Combat Logistics Regiment 3, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, adjust Lance Cpl. Andrew Best’s Modular Tactical Vest

A similar vest, made by Polish inventor Jan Szczepanik in 1901, saved the life of Alfonso XIII of Spain when he was shot by an attacker. By 1900, gangsters were wearing $800 silk vests to protect themselves.[10]

 

This all naturally led me to the history of firearms which I have included a bit of below:

The direct ancestor of the firearm is the fire lance, a black-powder–filled tube attached to the end of a spear and used as a flamethrower (not to be confused with the Byzantine flamethrower); shrapnel was sometimes placed in the barrel so that it would fly out together with the flames.[4][5] The earliest depiction of a gunpowder weapon is the illustration of a fire-lance on a mid-12th century silk banner from Dunhuang.[6] The De’an Shoucheng Lu, an account of the siege of De’an in 1132, records that Song forces used fire-lances against the Jurchens.[7]

old Chinese Hand Cannon on display at the Shaanxi history museum in Xi'An, China. The placard reads Bronze firearm, Yuan dynasty (1271-1368 ACE)

old Chinese Hand Cannon on display at the Shaanxi history museum in Xi’An, China. The placard reads Bronze firearm, Yuan dynasty (1271-1368 ACE)

In due course, the proportion of saltpeter in the propellant was increased to maximise its explosive power.[5] To better withstand that explosive power, the paper and bamboo of which fire-lance barrels were originally made came to be replaced by metal.[4] And to take full advantage of that power, the shrapnel came to be replaced by projectiles whose size and shape filled the barrel more closely.[5] With this, we have the three basic features of the gun: a barrel made of metal, high-nitrate gunpowder, and a projectile which totally occludes the muzzle so that the powder charge exerts its full potential in propellant effect.[8]

The earliest depiction of a gun is a sculpture from a cave in Sichuan dating to the 12th century of a figure carrying a vase-shaped bombard with flames and a cannonball coming out of it.[1][9] The oldest surviving gun, made of bronze, has been dated to 1288 because it was discovered at a site in modern-day Acheng District where the Yuan Shi records that battles were fought at that time; Li Ting, a military commander of Jurchen descent, led foot-soldiers armed with guns—including a Korean brigade—in battle to suppress the rebellion of the Christian Mongol prince Nayan.[10]

German grenade rifles from the 16th century (wheellock) and 18th century (flintlock) in the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, München

German grenade rifles from the 16th century (wheellock) and 18th century (flintlock) in the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, München

Guns - Safavid dynasty- Iran (Persia) - 17AD

Guns – Safavid dynasty- Iran (Persia) – 17AD

I know that firearms in our society today are a hot point in many conversations and social circles.  I create this post solely as a purpose of history to the devices.  I sincerely hope you enjoy, please be sure to let me know your thoughts 🙂

Enhanced by Zemanta

Baby Stroller

Sled Pram

Sled Pram

It is actually pretty amazing to see the evolution of the stroller thru old photos. From spring, to wartime to winter, there is, apparently a stroller for everything!

Gas resistant Pram

Gas resistant Pram

nazi_strollers_wien

Radio Pram

Radio Pram

gas pram Baby_Carriages

The Bicycle Pram

The Bicycle Pram

Fancy Pram

Fancy Pram

Victorian Pram

Victorian Pram

Sled Pram

Sled Pram

Enhanced by Zemanta

Africans

Zulu Shampoo and Bug Removal in 1903

Zulu Shampoo and Bug Removal in 1903\

Africa is such a diverse continent.  There are so many different types of tribes, peoples, landscapes and animals.  I am sure I could easily create a whole blog for each category and never come close to exposing the richness of the dark continent!  I have included photos from various times depicting various scenes.  With Africa being a central part of WWII, the continent was deeply embroiled and forever changed by the conflict.  Be sure to let me know your favorite or most moving photo, I always appreciate the feedback.  My favorite is the 1903 Zulu Motor Cab, but I am most intrigued by the little boy standing inside the elephant leg, what an odd thing!

Zulu Land - Old Africa in 1903

Zulu Land – Old Africa in 1903

This man, Renty, was an African-born slave owned by B.F. Taylor from Columbia, South Carolina when this portrait was taken in 1850.

This man, Renty, was an African-born slave owned by B.F. Taylor from Columbia, South Carolina when this portrait was taken in 1850.

The Zulu Motor Cab in 1903 (1)

The Zulu Motor Cab in 1903 (1)

Teddy Roosevelt station subsequent to a passed elephant on his African Expedition, 1909-1910

Teddy Roosevelt station subsequent to a passed elephant on his African Expedition, 1909-1910

Explorers Martin and Osa Johnson with their craft “The Spirit of Africa and Borneo” confront Marut tribesmen while on Safari, circa 1935.

Explorers Martin and Osa Johnson with their craft “The Spirit of Africa and Borneo” confront Marut tribesmen while on Safari, circa 1935.

Kaffir Kraal  Zulu Land 1903 (7)

Kaffir Kraal Zulu Land 1903 (7)

Kraal in 1903 (8)

Kraal in 1903 (8)

Rickshaw runner 1903 (5)

Rickshaw runner 1903 (5)

Siera Leone

Siera Leone

British soldiers teach African natives how to operate a 3.7cm anti-aircraft gun

British soldiers teach African natives how to operate a 3.7cm anti-aircraft gun

Autochrome of an armed Swazi warrior, Cape Town, South Africa, 1930.

Autochrome of an armed Swazi warrior, Cape Town, South Africa, 1930.

Deutsch-Ostafrika, Askariboy im Elefantenfuss

Deutsch-Ostafrika, Askariboy im Elefantenfuss

A group of South West African Herero people, starving after fleeing from their German rulers, 1907.

A group of South West African Herero people, starving after fleeing from their German rulers, 1907.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Preserving amatuer WWII photos

1525212_10152240834774101_60988609_n

If you have seen our blog before, you know that we just love old  “stuff”!  In our many auctions and moves and relocations, we have been carting around this one box with old papers in it.  We have been carting it around for a couple of years now!  Recently, while going thru some things we started examining this box of “stuff”.  In our minds, we struck gold.  We found an envelope which contained several old negatives.  upon examining them we found out they are shots from Europe during WWII!

I have no idea who these gentlemen are, but I am familiar with what they went thru and what they were fighting for!  I want to share these images as a way of honoring not only these men, but all men and women who have fought on any side of any war!  War is such a terrible thing and while necessary sometimes, it is never something to be taken lightly!  I hope you enjoy these photos, I wish I could give you more information on them but everyone in them is probably passed on by now.

1604759_10152240837904101_347404224_n 1596656_10152240840229101_1178080282_o 1560383_10152240839304101_120622228_n 1555376_10152240834359101_1699907056_n 1546463_10152240837504101_1030889909_n 1546408_10152240833874101_830834878_n 1525212_10152240834774101_60988609_n 1522591_10152240838309101_1106413156_o 1526756_10152240842579101_2134798166_n 1545113_10152240839679101_900975827_n 1545185_10152240834184101_1307827287_n 1546381_10152240833349101_359355813_n 1512632_10152240835329101_2074959127_n 1507436_10152240832994101_383385955_o 1505534_10152240836869101_1950512900_n 1487381_10152240843794101_1392146064_n 894925_10152240844024101_712110077_o 165947_10152240836469101_1567469820_n 9835_10152240839794101_895074187_n 149321_10152240835674101_40832968_n 72643_10152240835024101_1300928902_n

Enhanced by Zemanta

Comanche, Only US Army Survivor From Little Big Horn Battle

You are looking at an artistic picture of "Comanche," the only survivor of the Custer Massacre, 1876. History of the horse and regimental orders of the 7th Cavalry as to the care of "Comanche" as long as he shall live. It was created in 1887

You are looking at an artistic picture of “Comanche,” the only survivor of the Custer Massacre, 1876. History of the horse and regimental orders of the 7th Cavalry as to the care of “Comanche” as long as he shall live. It was created in 1887

COMANCHE

American Icon

It is the afternoon of 27 June 1876, on the Little Bighorn River  in southeastern Montana.  Members of the besieged group of soldiers from the  Reno Hill entrenchment sadly explore the scene of “sickening, ghastly horror” on Custer Hill.  They now know the answer to the question that so many had repeatedly asked two days before…”Where’s Custer?”

As they walked among the bloating, decaying bodies of their fallen comrades, all was still.  As the cavalrymen bowed their heads in silent prayer before beginning the odious task of burying the dead, the silence was abruptly broken by the faint whinny of a horse.  As the men looked up and searched the broken terrain with weary, tearful eyes, down by the river a horse was struggling to get to its feet.    Several of the men recognized the horse because of its peculiar buckskin-like color.  It was Comanche, the favorite mount of Capt. Myles Keogh, who had

Myles Keogh

Myles Keogh (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

valiantly rallied the men of “I” Company right up to the end, when they were overwhelmed by the charge of warriors under Crazy Horse and Gall.  The horse was on its haunches, seemingly too weak to move any further.  He had apparently sustained at least seven wounds, and his coat was matted with dried blood and soil.  CPT Nowlan ordered the men to get water for the horse from the river.  Several other troopers coaxed the horse onto its feet and led it away.  The farrier field dressed the wounds.  Comanche marched with the command to the junction of the Little Bighorn and Bighorn Rivers, and was loaded aboard the steamer “Far West” with the battle casualties, heading home to Fort Lincoln.  Comanche never again was to charge to the sound of the bugle. For the next 15 years he served as the spirit of the Seventh Cavalry supporting them throughout the remainder of the Indian Wars.  Symbolically, he died in 1891, soon after The Wounded Knee Conflict, established to be the end of major hostilities between the Native Americans and the military.  TAPS, for an old soldier who served his country  well, in so many ways.

A fully recovered Comanche at Fort Lincoln after the Battle

Comanche is now remembered as the only surviving member of LTC George A. Custer‘s immediate command at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

He has always been a symbol of the role of the U.S. Cavalry in the taming of the great plains during the era of  western expansion. When he died in 1891 his remains were preserved for eternity. Comanche now resides in the Dyche Natural History Museum on the campus of the University of Kansas at Lawrence. He resides in a specially designed humidity-controlled glass enclosure. 

Comanche joined the 7th Cavalry on April 3, 1868. He had been captured somewhere on the southern plains and brought, along with other horses, to a remount station in St. Louis, Missouri.  There, he was purchased by the Army for the existing rate of $90.  Comanche had his initial breaking-in at the remount station and then was shipped with a group of other horses to Fort Leavenworth. There, Comanche had his introduction to the 7th Cavalry when he was chosen to be among the 41 horses that LT Tom Custer (brother of the General) selected to be loaded on a train bound for Ellis Station, where the 7th was encamped. He arrived at the encampment on May 19, 1868, a little over one month after joining the army.  It was here that Comanche caught the eye of Capt Keogh, who was looking for a replacement for a horse that had been shot from under him in a skirmish with Indians.  After eyeing the new “recruits” for several minutes, something must have made Comanche stand out as having the potential to be a good cavalry mount.  Surely officers had first choice in selecting a horse for their use, and Keogh quickly ordered Comanche to be his mount.  Keogh may have purchased Comanche from the army. Be that as it may, they were inseparable until that fateful day in June, 1876.

Photograph taken in 1879 during U.S. Army re-b...

Photograph taken in 1879 during U.S. Army re-burial visit to the Custer battlefield. The expedition was led by Captain George K. Sanderson, seen here in the foreground looking at the recently erected monument to Myles Keogh and the fallen members of Company I, 7th US Cavalry. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There is some controversy as to how Comanche got his name. The most widely accepted story is that on September 13, 1868 Capt Keogh was involved in a skirmish with a band of Comanche Indians. During the fight the horse was wounded by an arrow in the right hind quarter. The arrow was later removed, and the wound healed. After the battle, a trooper who witnessed the incident claimed that when the arrow struck, the horse “yelled just like a Comanche” If this were true, then Comanche would have been in Keogh’s possession for over four months without having been assigned a name.  This seems to be an unlikely scenario, as just with a newborn infant, a name or method of identifying the child is quickly established.  Another story might explain the naming delay.  So it goes, Keogh was on a scouting mission near Fort Larned, Kansas.  During a skirmish with the Comanches, Keogh’s horse was killed.  Supposedly his Lt. dismounted one of the enlisted men and turned the mount over to Keogh, who kept the horse from that point on. The horse was then named Comanche, and became Keogh’s favorite mount from that point on. It is stated that at that time, with the exception of the officers’ horses, it was not customary to give names to cavalry horses.
What did Comanche look like? As one inspects the old photos of Comanche, he appears to be dark in color, typical of the bay mounts used by the cavalry.  This aberration of his true color, variously described as “claybank,” “light bay” or  “buckskin dun” is probably a function of the level of sophistication of frontier photography. On July 25, 1887, 2LT James D. Thomas, Acting Adjutant of 7th Cavalry at Ft. Meade, Dakota Territory, certified a description of Comanche prior to transferring his care to CPT Henry J. Nowlan, 7th Cavalry:Name: Comanche
Age: 6 years(25 years at time of transfer)
Height: 15 hands
Weight: 925 pounds
Color: Buckskin
Condition: Unserviceable
Date of Purchase: April 3, 1868
By Whom: (left blank)
Cost: $90.00
Purchased: St. Louis, Missouri
Remarks: excused from all duties per G.O. No. 7 April 10, 1878. Ridden by CPT Keogh in Battle of Little Bighorn River, M.T. June 25, 1876
Comanche and Keogh served with “I” Company and Keogh for the remainder of his active career. However, due to deployments of “I” Company away from the main regiment and leaves of absence taken by Keogh, Comanche missed the major battles engaged in by the unit. At the time of the summer, 1867 campaign that included the Kidder Massacre, Keogh was commanding officer at Fort Wallace. During the Washita campaign, Keogh was on GEN Sully’s staff, assigned to Fort Harker. At the time of the 1873 Yellowstone Expedition, Keogh was serving on detached duty with the International Boundary Commission at Fort Totten, Minnesota, near Canada. Keogh was on leave, visiting his home land, and therefore was not a part of the 1874 Black Hills expedition. The latter proved to be more of a pleasure trip, since no significant engagement with Indians was made.
It took almost a year for Comanche to recover from his wounds. His care was always under the watchful eye of Gustave Korn, the farrier, assigned to him by CPT Nowlan. Comanche quickly became the mascot of the 7th at Ft. Lincoln, and legend has it that the daughter of the commander (COL Sturgis), convinced CPT Nowlan to let her ride Comanche about the post. Then one day the daughter of another officer requested and was granted permission to ride Comanche, and when Sturgis’s daughter became aware of this she became so enraged that her special status had been breached that she caused a lot of trouble around the Sturgis household. This, more than anything else probably led to COL Sturgis issuing G.O.[General Orders] No. 7. In part, this stated that “…a special and comfortable stall is fitted up for him, and he will not be ridden by any person whatsoever under any circumstances, nor will he be put to any kind of work.” Comanche could be used in parades, draped in mourning and led by a mounted trooper of Troop I.
Comanche at Fort Riley, Kansas

Comanche at Fort Riley, Kansas

From that point on, Comanche led a free and peaceful life. he was allowed the freedom of the Post, the only living thing that wandered at will over the parade grounds at the fort without a reprimand from a commanding officer.  When the bugle sounded “formation,” Comanche would trot out to his place in front of the line of Troop I. He would be given sugar cubes on demand at the door of the officers’ quarters and then saunter on down to the enlisted men’s canteen where a specially placed bucket of beer awaited him.  Gustave Korn and Comanche became inseparable.  Comanche would follow Korn everywhere. When the unit returned to Ft. Riley, Kansas, it is stated that Korn was visiting a lady friend in the nearby town of Junction City.  When Korn did not return to the base to feed and groom Comanche for the evening, that the horse looked all over the base for Korn, finally going directly to the house of the girlfriend to escort Korn back to the Post. When Korn was killed at Wounded Knee in 1890, Comanche’s health began to slowly deteriorate. He died on November 7, 1891.

Comanche preserved forever at the University of Kansas

The officers and men of the 7th Cavalry were heartbroken. One of them suggested that Comanche be preserved forever by being mounted and kept with the unit.  A famous professor at the University of Kansas Museum of Natural History was summoned to the Fort. He agreed to preserve Comanche for $400 and the right to display the horse at the upcoming Exposition in Chicago in 1893. Later, when for reasons still not clear, the bill was not paid and Dyche agreed to keep Comanche in lieu of payment. Comanche still stands there today for all to see – the “sole survivor of Custer’s command at the Little Bighorn.

Enhanced by Zemanta